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Recommended Reading A Day In The Life Of Cartier North America President Mercedes Abramo, Via 'The Cut'

Cartier's top executive in North America on work-life balance, confidence and humility, and making sure things don't get lost in the shuffle.

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The Richemont Group has a lot of luxury brands in its portfolio, but Cartier is the jewel in the crown. "Jeweler of Kings, and king of jewelers," the company, which for much of its history consisted of just three stores in London, Paris, and New York, is now a sprawling global entity with, according to Forbes, nearly three hundred boutiques worldwide.

Mercedes Abramo, CEO Cartier North America

Mercedes Abramo is the president and CEO of Cartier North America and is both the first woman and the first American to hold the position. An industry veteran, Abramo began her professional life with Cartier back in 2008, when she became director of the New York flagship boutique. She became president and CEO in June of 2014 and oversees the entire North American retail network, including 35 boutiques, e-commerce, and a network of 150 retailers. She also sits on the advisory board of the Luxury Education Foundation, a public non-profit which develops educational programs for future leaders in the luxury industry.

Cartier flagship boutique, 5th Avenue, New York

The Cartier flagship boutique in New York. Cost to Cartier in 1917: $100, and one hell of a necklace.

This is all by way of saying that on any given day, Abramo has a lot on her plate, and recently she sat down with Kathleen Hou at New York Magazine's style section, The Cut, to talk about how she negotiates the many, sometimes conflicting daily demands of her job while maintaining some semblance of a personal life. Cartier is a company that lives in the details and Abramo's approach to managing its North American operations does likewise.